Cœuvres Castle

Cœuvres Castle, locally known as Château de Cœuvres, lies in the village of Cœuvres-et-Valsery, in the Aisne department in France.

Cœuvres Castle dates back to the 16th century when it was probably built by a member of the Estrées family, nobles already known since the 15th century. 

In the beginning of the 17th century it was owned by François Annibal d'Estrées, first Marquis of Cœuvres but later made Duke of Estrées by Louis XIV of France. He had the castle embellished in 1608. At the end of that century it passed to the Tellier family through marriage.

In 1771 Louis Charles César Le Tellier died without issue and the castle was inherited by Louis Alexandre Céleste d'Aumont de Villequier. During the French Revolution, in 1791, Louis helped organize the Flight to Varennes of King Louis XVI of France, his queen Marie Antoinette, and their immediate family. It was an attempt to escape from Paris in order to initiate a counter-revolution. The attempt failed and the king and his family were captured at Varennes. After that failure Louis also fled, to Brussels, and his estate and castle were confiscated.

Cœuvres Castle was then put up for sale and bought, in 1797, by Charles Raymond de Grange de Rancy. Through inheritance it passed to Albert de Bertier de Sauvigny in 1883.

In September 1914 German troops entered the castle and Albert was forced to accommodate Ernst Gunther, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein, and the Prince of Saxe-Meiningen. Two weeks later the Germans were expelled during the First Battle of the Marne and the castle was taken into use by the French 6th Army. General Michel Joseph Maunory installed his headquarters here. During the course of WW I the castle would be used by various regiments and served as a hospital. In 1918, during the Second Battle of the Marne, the village and castle were situated in the midst of heavy artillery fire and tank fights during which they were completely ruined.

At present Cœuvres Castle can not be visited as it is now used as a home for the local elderly. Its western tower stands empty. A nice chateau. Must be special to live there as an elderly.


Gallery

Cœuvres Castle

Cœuvres Castle, locally known as Château de Cœuvres, lies in the village of Cœuvres-et-Valsery, in the Aisne department in France.

Cœuvres Castle dates back to the 16th century when it was probably built by a member of the Estrées family, nobles already known since the 15th century. 

In the beginning of the 17th century it was owned by François Annibal d'Estrées, first Marquis of Cœuvres but later made Duke of Estrées by Louis XIV of France. He had the castle embellished in 1608. At the end of that century it passed to the Tellier family through marriage.

In 1771 Louis Charles César Le Tellier died without issue and the castle was inherited by Louis Alexandre Céleste d'Aumont de Villequier. During the French Revolution, in 1791, Louis helped organize the Flight to Varennes of King Louis XVI of France, his queen Marie Antoinette, and their immediate family. It was an attempt to escape from Paris in order to initiate a counter-revolution. The attempt failed and the king and his family were captured at Varennes. After that failure Louis also fled, to Brussels, and his estate and castle were confiscated.

Cœuvres Castle was then put up for sale and bought, in 1797, by Charles Raymond de Grange de Rancy. Through inheritance it passed to Albert de Bertier de Sauvigny in 1883.

In September 1914 German troops entered the castle and Albert was forced to accommodate Ernst Gunther, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein, and the Prince of Saxe-Meiningen. Two weeks later the Germans were expelled during the First Battle of the Marne and the castle was taken into use by the French 6th Army. General Michel Joseph Maunory installed his headquarters here. During the course of WW I the castle would be used by various regiments and served as a hospital. In 1918, during the Second Battle of the Marne, the village and castle were situated in the midst of heavy artillery fire and tank fights during which they were completely ruined.

At present Cœuvres Castle can not be visited as it is now used as a home for the local elderly. Its western tower stands empty. A nice chateau. Must be special to live there as an elderly.


Gallery