Châteaugay Castle

Châteaugay Castle, locally known as Château de Châteaugay, lies in the village of the same name, in the Puy-de-Dôme department in France.

The first castle at this site, a plateau dominating the plain of Limagne below, was built in the 11th century and called Vigosche Castle. It served as an outpost for the town of Riom. Of this castle nothing remains.

In 1381, Pierre I de Giac, chancellor of Charles VI of France, erected a new castle consisting of a square keep and an enclosure with a main building with 2 turrets. His grandson, Pierre II, imprisoned his pregnant wife Jeanne de Naillac in the castle's keep, in 1425, on the false pretense that she was a mistress of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy. While in captivity he poisoned her after which he had her corpse thrown of a cliff. In reality Pierre just wanted to get rid of her to be able to marry his own mistress; Catherine de L'Isle Bouchard.

Around 1430 the enclosure was strengthened with 2 round towers at its north facade, which were named the Fort Tower and the Perrière Tower. At the end of the 15th century Châteaugay Castle went to the La Queuille family through inheritance who then restored it and adapted it to their wishes. 

In May 1789 a meeting was held in the castle between its owner; Jean Claude Marie Victor de La Queuille, Maquis of Châteaugay, and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, in preparation for the reform of the Estates General of 1789 and the abolition of feudal privileges. Following the French Revolution the La Queuille family abandoned the castle.

At the beginning of the 19th century the moat around the castle was filled in and walls were demolished. In 1828 it was even proposed to tear down the entire castle by turning it into a quarry. Luckily this plan was not realized.

At present Châteaugay Castle is used for cultural purposes. Its mighty keep can be visited but was closed when I came by, sadly enough.


Gallery

Châteaugay Castle

Châteaugay Castle, locally known as Château de Châteaugay, lies in the village of the same name, in the Puy-de-Dôme department in France.

The first castle at this site, a plateau dominating the plain of Limagne below, was built in the 11th century and called Vigosche Castle. It served as an outpost for the town of Riom. Of this castle nothing remains.

In 1381, Pierre I de Giac, chancellor of Charles VI of France, erected a new castle consisting of a square keep and an enclosure with a main building with 2 turrets. His grandson, Pierre II, imprisoned his pregnant wife Jeanne de Naillac in the castle's keep, in 1425, on the false pretense that she was a mistress of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy. While in captivity he poisoned her after which he had her corpse thrown of a cliff. In reality Pierre just wanted to get rid of her to be able to marry his own mistress; Catherine de L'Isle Bouchard.

Around 1430 the enclosure was strengthened with 2 round towers at its north facade, which were named the Fort Tower and the Perrière Tower. At the end of the 15th century Châteaugay Castle went to the La Queuille family through inheritance who then restored it and adapted it to their wishes. 

In May 1789 a meeting was held in the castle between its owner; Jean Claude Marie Victor de La Queuille, Maquis of Châteaugay, and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, in preparation for the reform of the Estates General of 1789 and the abolition of feudal privileges. Following the French Revolution the La Queuille family abandoned the castle.

At the beginning of the 19th century the moat around the castle was filled in and walls were demolished. In 1828 it was even proposed to tear down the entire castle by turning it into a quarry. Luckily this plan was not realized.

At present Châteaugay Castle is used for cultural purposes. Its mighty keep can be visited but was closed when I came by, sadly enough.


Gallery