Bungay Castle

Bungay Castle, sometimes also known as Bigod Castle, lies in the village of Bungay, in the county of Suffolk in England.

Bungay Castle started out as a Norman motte-and-bailey castle built out of wood and earthworks, built by the Norman knight Roger Bigod of Norfolk, around 1103. It was strategically situated in a bend of the River Waveney. Only from 1140 on the castle was started to being rebuilt in stone by Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

During the civil war in the mid-12th century, known as The Anarchy, Hugh had rebelled against King Stephen and following the accession of Henry II, was deprived of both Bungay and Framlingham castles. They were returned to Hugh in 1163/4 and he started a building campaign which saw the erection of a massive stone keep on the former motte. In the Revolt of 1173-1174, Hugh again ended up on the losing side and Bungay Castle was besieged. Apparently it escaped serious damage and the Bigod's were forced to pay huge fines, after which the castle was restored to them.

Until 1294 the battered castle had fallen into neglect when it was restored by another Roger Bigod. He probably built the 2 gate towers and the curtain wall surrounding the keep. After Roger's death in 1297 Bungay Castle reverted to the Crown. It fell into disrepair and by 1382 it was already described as 'old and ruinous'.

In 1483 the castle became part of the Norfolk estate but wasn't cared for anymore and deteriorated further. In 1766 the ruined keep and curtain walling were even quarried for road building materials.

In 1834 several dwellings which had been built in and around the castle ruin were removed. 

At present Bungay Castle's remains can freely be visited. A nice compact castle ruin.


Gallery

Bungay Castle

Bungay Castle, sometimes also known as Bigod Castle, lies in the village of Bungay, in the county of Suffolk in England.

Bungay Castle started out as a Norman motte-and-bailey castle built out of wood and earthworks, built by the Norman knight Roger Bigod of Norfolk, around 1103. It was strategically situated in a bend of the River Waveney. Only from 1140 on the castle was started to being rebuilt in stone by Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.

During the civil war in the mid-12th century, known as The Anarchy, Hugh had rebelled against King Stephen and following the accession of Henry II, was deprived of both Bungay and Framlingham castles. They were returned to Hugh in 1163/4 and he started a building campaign which saw the erection of a massive stone keep on the former motte. In the Revolt of 1173-1174, Hugh again ended up on the losing side and Bungay Castle was besieged. Apparently it escaped serious damage and the Bigod's were forced to pay huge fines, after which the castle was restored to them.

Until 1294 the battered castle had fallen into neglect when it was restored by another Roger Bigod. He probably built the 2 gate towers and the curtain wall surrounding the keep. After Roger's death in 1297 Bungay Castle reverted to the Crown. It fell into disrepair and by 1382 it was already described as 'old and ruinous'.

In 1483 the castle became part of the Norfolk estate but wasn't cared for anymore and deteriorated further. In 1766 the ruined keep and curtain walling were even quarried for road building materials.

In 1834 several dwellings which had been built in and around the castle ruin were removed. 

At present Bungay Castle's remains can freely be visited. A nice compact castle ruin.


Gallery