Brionne Tower

Brionne Tower, locally known as Donjon de Brionne, lies above the village of the same name, in the Eure department in the Upper Normandy region in France.

The town of Brionne already existed in Roman times. It was defended by a fortification on a small islet in the river Risle, which flows through the town. This older fortification was besieged twice; first in 1047 and then in 1090. After that second siege the Lord of Brionne, Robert I de Meulan, built a massive square Norman keep on a hill overlooking the town. It was defended by an earthen enclosure and a dry moat from the rest of the plateau.

In 1124, King Henry I of England, besieged the tower, which was then owned by Galeran de Meulan, a son of Robert. In 1194 the town was taken by King Philip II of France.

In 1421, the town was attacked and pillaged by an English army. In 1562 it was sacked again, this time by Protestant troops.

In 1735, Brionne Tower was largely demolished by the townspeople to provide building materials for several mills at the Risle river.

At present Brionne Tower consists of the northern and part of the western wall, up to a height of 17 meters. When it was still complete it would have been a square keep, of 20 by 20 meters and with 4 meter thick walls. It would have had 3 floors.

At present the area around the tower is a small town park and can be visited freely. This must have been a great keep when it was still complete.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/brionne-tower#sigFreeId821515f79f

Brionne Tower

Brionne Tower, locally known as Donjon de Brionne, lies above the village of the same name, in the Eure department in the Upper Normandy region in France.

The town of Brionne already existed in Roman times. It was defended by a fortification on a small islet in the river Risle, which flows through the town. This older fortification was besieged twice; first in 1047 and then in 1090. After that second siege the Lord of Brionne, Robert I de Meulan, built a massive square Norman keep on a hill overlooking the town. It was defended by an earthen enclosure and a dry moat from the rest of the plateau.

In 1124, King Henry I of England, besieged the tower, which was then owned by Galeran de Meulan, a son of Robert. In 1194 the town was taken by King Philip II of France.

In 1421, the town was attacked and pillaged by an English army. In 1562 it was sacked again, this time by Protestant troops.

In 1735, Brionne Tower was largely demolished by the townspeople to provide building materials for several mills at the Risle river.

At present Brionne Tower consists of the northern and part of the western wall, up to a height of 17 meters. When it was still complete it would have been a square keep, of 20 by 20 meters and with 4 meter thick walls. It would have had 3 floors.

At present the area around the tower is a small town park and can be visited freely. This must have been a great keep when it was still complete.


Gallery

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://castles.nl/brionne-tower#sigFreeId821515f79f