Bouillon Castle

Bouillon Castle, locally known as Château-Fort de Bouillon, lies above the town of the same name, in the Luxembourg province in the Wallonia region in Belgium.

Bouillon Castle was probably built during the 8th century on a narrow ridge inbetween a meander of the Semois river. It was first mentioned in 988 AD.

In 1076 Bouillon Castle was given to Godfrey of Bouillon by Henry IV, the Holy Roman Emperor. He had a keep built between 1080 and 1090. In 1095 Godfrey answered the call of Pope Urban II to go on the First Crusade. So Godfrey took out loans on his lands and Bouillon Castle from Otbert, Prince-Bishop of Liège, to finance his crusade. After Godfrey died in Jerusalem in 1100 the castle became the full property of the Prince-Bishop. During the next 4 centuries the castle was besieged and taken several times.

In 1415 the Prince-Bishop John III granted the position of castellan of Bouillon Castle to the House of La Marck. This family delivered several Prince-Bishops in the next centuries and started to call themselves Dukes of Bouillon. During the Italian War of 1551–1559, Bouillon was occupied by the forces of Henry II of France to keep them free from Habsburg influence, but Henry confirmed Robert IV de La Marck as Duke of Bouillon. In 1574 the castle went from the House of La Marck to the La Tour d'Auvergne family through marriage.

France invaded the Duchy of Bouillon in 1676, during the Franco-Dutch War. In 1680 Louis XIV of France sent Vauban, the famous military engineer to Bouillon. Vauban then transformed the castle into a first-class fortification.

In the wake of the French Revolution, the French Revolutionary Army invaded the Duchy of Bouillon in 1794, creating the short-lived Republic of Bouillon. In 1795, Bouillon was annexed to France. In 1815 Bouillon Castle was annexed to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. During that time the keep was destroyed. In 1830, after the Belgian Revolution, the castle became part of Belgium. The Belgian authorities downgraded it in 1853.

After the Battle of Sedan, in 1870, Bouillon Castle was used as a military hospital by the Prussian army. In the 20th century the castle became a tourist destination.

At present Bouillon Castle can be visited for a fee. A great castle with lots of passageways and subterranean spaces to explore. Recommended.


Gallery

Bouillon Castle

Bouillon Castle, locally known as Château-Fort de Bouillon, lies above the town of the same name, in the Luxembourg province in the Wallonia region in Belgium.

Bouillon Castle was probably built during the 8th century on a narrow ridge inbetween a meander of the Semois river. It was first mentioned in 988 AD.

In 1076 Bouillon Castle was given to Godfrey of Bouillon by Henry IV, the Holy Roman Emperor. He had a keep built between 1080 and 1090. In 1095 Godfrey answered the call of Pope Urban II to go on the First Crusade. So Godfrey took out loans on his lands and Bouillon Castle from Otbert, Prince-Bishop of Liège, to finance his crusade. After Godfrey died in Jerusalem in 1100 the castle became the full property of the Prince-Bishop. During the next 4 centuries the castle was besieged and taken several times.

In 1415 the Prince-Bishop John III granted the position of castellan of Bouillon Castle to the House of La Marck. This family delivered several Prince-Bishops in the next centuries and started to call themselves Dukes of Bouillon. During the Italian War of 1551–1559, Bouillon was occupied by the forces of Henry II of France to keep them free from Habsburg influence, but Henry confirmed Robert IV de La Marck as Duke of Bouillon. In 1574 the castle went from the House of La Marck to the La Tour d'Auvergne family through marriage.

France invaded the Duchy of Bouillon in 1676, during the Franco-Dutch War. In 1680 Louis XIV of France sent Vauban, the famous military engineer to Bouillon. Vauban then transformed the castle into a first-class fortification.

In the wake of the French Revolution, the French Revolutionary Army invaded the Duchy of Bouillon in 1794, creating the short-lived Republic of Bouillon. In 1795, Bouillon was annexed to France. In 1815 Bouillon Castle was annexed to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. During that time the keep was destroyed. In 1830, after the Belgian Revolution, the castle became part of Belgium. The Belgian authorities downgraded it in 1853.

After the Battle of Sedan, in 1870, Bouillon Castle was used as a military hospital by the Prussian army. In the 20th century the castle became a tourist destination.

At present Bouillon Castle can be visited for a fee. A great castle with lots of passageways and subterranean spaces to explore. Recommended.


Gallery