Anjony Castle

Anjony Castle, locally known as Château de Anjony, lies next to the village of Tournemire, in the Cantal department in France.

Louis I d'Anjony, who had fought at the side of Jeanne d'Arc, built Anjony Castle in 1430. He had it built next to the village of Tournemire and below the, now disappeared, castle of the Lord of Tournemire.

The Anjony and Tournemire families had already been opponents since the start of the Hundred Years' War, in the mid-14th century, when the Anjonys backed the French King and the Tournemires choose the side of the Plantagenets. Louis had therefore not requested prior authorization from the Tournemires to build his castle, but did obtain permission from Charles VII of France.

The feud between the two families reached an all time low in 1523, when Jean de Tournemire had the remains of the priest of Marmanhac, a son of Jean II d'Anjony exhumed, to be thrown in front of the door of Anjony Castle. The frescoed chapel in the castle was installed in the castle in 1526, to compensate for the fact that attendance at the parish church had become impossible for the Anjony family. The feud ended in 1610 when Michel II d'Anjony married the heiress of the Tournemires. It flared up for a final time in 1623 when a duel between the representatives of the two families took place in front of the parish church of Tournemire and caused the death of three members of each family.

In 1634, Michel III d'Anjony married Gabrielle de Pesteils. When their daughter Gabrielle d'Anjony married Gabriel de Léotoing, later that century, the castle passed to the Léotoing family. Robert IV de Léotoing d'Anjony added a wing to the castle in the mid-18th century to have a more comfortable residence. His son, Claude-Louis, added a 2nd wing, adjacent to the first, at the end of the 18th century. Claude-Louis wasn't to enjoy his new extension very long because he had to emigrate during the French Revolution, after which the castle was confiscated and, in 1791, sold as national property.

The castle was later returned to the Léotoing d'Anjony family. Through marriage it passed to the Pellissier de Féligonde family in 1837. The castle is now a museum while the wings next to it are still the private residence of the descendants of all its previous owners, who are now carrying the name Pellissier de Léotoing d'Anjony.

Anjony Castle was built out of basaltic rock as a square keep with high, round towers flanking its corners. As it was never attacked or subjected to demolition it still stands as a great example of a 15th century fortress.

At present Anjony Castle can be visited for a fee, only with a guided tour. A really nice castle. Recommended.


Gallery

Anjony Castle

Anjony Castle, locally known as Château de Anjony, lies next to the village of Tournemire, in the Cantal department in France.

Louis I d'Anjony, who had fought at the side of Jeanne d'Arc, built Anjony Castle in 1430. He had it built next to the village of Tournemire and below the, now disappeared, castle of the Lord of Tournemire.

The Anjony and Tournemire families had already been opponents since the start of the Hundred Years' War, in the mid-14th century, when the Anjonys backed the French King and the Tournemires choose the side of the Plantagenets. Louis had therefore not requested prior authorization from the Tournemires to build his castle, but did obtain permission from Charles VII of France.

The feud between the two families reached an all time low in 1523, when Jean de Tournemire had the remains of the priest of Marmanhac, a son of Jean II d'Anjony exhumed, to be thrown in front of the door of Anjony Castle. The frescoed chapel in the castle was installed in the castle in 1526, to compensate for the fact that attendance at the parish church had become impossible for the Anjony family. The feud ended in 1610 when Michel II d'Anjony married the heiress of the Tournemires. It flared up for a final time in 1623 when a duel between the representatives of the two families took place in front of the parish church of Tournemire and caused the death of three members of each family.

In 1634, Michel III d'Anjony married Gabrielle de Pesteils. When their daughter Gabrielle d'Anjony married Gabriel de Léotoing, later that century, the castle passed to the Léotoing family. Robert IV de Léotoing d'Anjony added a wing to the castle in the mid-18th century to have a more comfortable residence. His son, Claude-Louis, added a 2nd wing, adjacent to the first, at the end of the 18th century. Claude-Louis wasn't to enjoy his new extension very long because he had to emigrate during the French Revolution, after which the castle was confiscated and, in 1791, sold as national property.

The castle was later returned to the Léotoing d'Anjony family. Through marriage it passed to the Pellissier de Féligonde family in 1837. The castle is now a museum while the wings next to it are still the private residence of the descendants of all its previous owners, who are now carrying the name Pellissier de Léotoing d'Anjony.

Anjony Castle was built out of basaltic rock as a square keep with high, round towers flanking its corners. As it was never attacked or subjected to demolition it still stands as a great example of a 15th century fortress.

At present Anjony Castle can be visited for a fee, only with a guided tour. A really nice castle. Recommended.


Gallery