Ananuri Castle

Ananuri Castle lies next to the village of the same name, in the Dusheti municipality in the Mtskheta-Mtianeti region in Georgia.

The oldest part of Ananuri Castle is the watch tower, in the style of the Khevsuri highlanders, that abuts the largest church. This tower dates back to the 14th/15th century. The castle itself was built during the 17th/18th century and was the seat of the Dukes of Aragvi. Inside its walls were built 2 churches. The smallest one; the Church of the Virgin, was built in first halt of the 17th century. The larger one; the Church of the Mother of God, was built in 1689 for the son of Duke Bardzem.

In 1739, Ananuri was attacked by forces from a rival duchy, commanded by Shanshe, the Duke of Ksani, and was set on fire. The Aragvi clan was massacred. However, 4 years later, the local peasants revolted against rule by Shanshe, killing the usurpers and inviting King Teimuraz II to rule directly over them. From then on the castle became the residence of the king's officials.

In 1746, however, King Teimuraz was forced to suppress another peasant uprising, with the help of King Erekle II of Kakheti. In 1786 the castle was part of a small town. In 1812, during the Kakheti revolt, it was overrun by Russian troops. After that the importance of the castle diminished.

Since 2007 Ananuri Castle has been on the tentative list for inclusion into the UNESCO World Heritage Site program.

Ananuri Castle has a rectangular ground plan and was built on a hill at the confluence of the Arkala and Aragvi rivers. Because of the Zhinvali Dam the castle now lies at the southern shore of the Zhinvali Reservoir. The large tower in the middle of the west curtain wall served as a keep.

Ananuri Castle can freely be visited during opening hours. A great castle but a bit of a tourist trap because of its proximity to Tbilisi. The large square in front of the castle is crowded with tourist stalls and busloads of tourists are brought here every day. Sadly enough, for me, this does take away some of the joy of visiting a nice castle like this. But it is still recommended. The smaller church can not be visited and in the larger one photography is prohibited.


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Ananuri Castle

Ananuri Castle lies next to the village of the same name, in the Dusheti municipality in the Mtskheta-Mtianeti region in Georgia.

The oldest part of Ananuri Castle is the watch tower, in the style of the Khevsuri highlanders, that abuts the largest church. This tower dates back to the 14th/15th century. The castle itself was built during the 17th/18th century and was the seat of the Dukes of Aragvi. Inside its walls were built 2 churches. The smallest one; the Church of the Virgin, was built in first halt of the 17th century. The larger one; the Church of the Mother of God, was built in 1689 for the son of Duke Bardzem.

In 1739, Ananuri was attacked by forces from a rival duchy, commanded by Shanshe, the Duke of Ksani, and was set on fire. The Aragvi clan was massacred. However, 4 years later, the local peasants revolted against rule by Shanshe, killing the usurpers and inviting King Teimuraz II to rule directly over them. From then on the castle became the residence of the king's officials.

In 1746, however, King Teimuraz was forced to suppress another peasant uprising, with the help of King Erekle II of Kakheti. In 1786 the castle was part of a small town. In 1812, during the Kakheti revolt, it was overrun by Russian troops. After that the importance of the castle diminished.

Since 2007 Ananuri Castle has been on the tentative list for inclusion into the UNESCO World Heritage Site program.

Ananuri Castle has a rectangular ground plan and was built on a hill at the confluence of the Arkala and Aragvi rivers. Because of the Zhinvali Dam the castle now lies at the southern shore of the Zhinvali Reservoir. The large tower in the middle of the west curtain wall served as a keep.

Ananuri Castle can freely be visited during opening hours. A great castle but a bit of a tourist trap because of its proximity to Tbilisi. The large square in front of the castle is crowded with tourist stalls and busloads of tourists are brought here every day. Sadly enough, for me, this does take away some of the joy of visiting a nice castle like this. But it is still recommended. The smaller church can not be visited and in the larger one photography is prohibited.


Gallery